Category Archives: High School

My Favorite Teacher Circle: PASTA

Just got back from the fall meeting of my favorite local teacher circle, PASTA.  The Philadelphia-Area Statistics Teachers Association meets a few times each year to share best-practices in statistics teaching.  Many of this month’s presenters are AP Statistics readers, and the ideas are not specific only to stats…we just share great classroom action.  I gave a recap of our last meeting in the winter; enjoy the great ideas from our Fall meeting, and visit Beth Benzing’s website for materials from the meeting!

Daren Starnes, famous in the Stats-world as author of The Practice of Statistics, shared his first experience with Team Quizzes.  I have tried team quizzes before, mostly for quizzes where I knew students were having the most difficulties with material.  But Daren added some features I had not before considered:

  • Students are assigned to their teams at random.
  • Each team member received a copy of the quiz, and must complete the quiz.
  • In a quiz, one question is chosen randomly to be graded from each paper.  A student’s grade is a combination of the score they receive on the question, along with the average of the scores from the other papers in the team.

Daren also commented on the roles of introverts and extroverts in the teams, and how this method could empower introverted students to self-advocate.  He suggest the book Quiet: The Power of Introverts as a resource.

AdamAdam Shrager, famous as the social director and man-about-town at the AP readings, shared his movie-correlations activity.  This has become one of my favorite activities during the stats year.  Students are asked to fill out a movie-preference survey, which Adam then uses to compute peer-to-peer correltations in Excel.  (look for “correlation” in excel…you may need to activate the Stat Pack) Discussions regarding the interpretation of positive and negative correlations then occur.  Most importantly, mis-conceptions of the meaning of low or zero r-values are discussed with a context easily understood by students.

Table

Leigh Nataro shared her “Pacing a Normal Distance” activity, where students walked between 3 different campus buildings using “meter-long” steps.  The data is then entered into Fathom, and is used to discuss variability, the 68-95 rule, and normal probability plots.  Fun discussions of outliers and error as well!

Leigh

Our host, Beth Benzing from Strath Haven High School, shared a family income Fathom file which draws samples of various sizes from a clearly skewed distribution.  In addition to to having students record observations and work towards generalizations, Beth has worked to increase the rigor in her associated questions, using past AP items as her framework.  Some examples:

  • What is the probability that a sample of 5 families will have a combined income of over $500,000?
  • What is more likely: a sample of size 5 having a mean income of over $80,000, or a sample of size 25 having a mean income over $80,000?  You may recall a similar AP question from a few years ago regarding samples of fish.

Beth

Brian Forney shared ideas for bringing concepts from Sustainability to the AP Stats classroom.  In one example, Brian shared data on depths of ice sheets over time, with excellent opportunities to discuss cause and effect from scatterplots.  Check out Brian’s presentation on Beth’s website.

Finally, I was happy to share my recent lesson on Rock, Paper, Scissors and two-way tables.

The meeting concluded with some great ideas for making multiple-choice assessments more fair and effective.  There were a number of excellent ideas here, but I think I’ll look up some more info on alternate assessment methods and save it for another post…so stay tuned!

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A Math Teacher Ventures Into a Western Civ Class

During my prep period last week, I came back to my classroom after a trip to the main office and overheard some familiar language: Euclid, Pythagoras, The Elements.  What’s intriguing here is that my next-door neighbor isn’t a geometry teacher; rather, my colleague Glen is a social studies teacher, with 3 sections of Western Civ each day.  Excited, I popped my head into his classroom.  And after some good-batured ribbing out how he was advancing on my math turf, I went back to my prep.  But Glen and I later talked about our shared interest in the Greeks, which ended with an invitation to come into his class to share a brief math history lesson.  I’m no stranger to the occassional cross-curriculur lesson, so this represented a fun opportunity.

One on my favorite courses from my time at Muhlenberg College was “Landmarks in Greek Mathematics”, where I was fortunate to have William Dunham as a professor.  His enthusiasm for math storytelling has shaped my approach as a teacher, and his book, Journey Through Genius, was not only used in the course, but is a book I often come back to for inspiration and contextual reminders of math concepts.  The book both walks you through the mathematical landmarks (like Euclid’s proof of the infinitude of primes) and provides a backdrop of the places and people (like the fascinating battling Bernoulli brothers) which shaped the surrounding culture.  It’s a great resource for any math teacher.

For Glen’s classes, I chose an example which 11th graders could easily understand and which would provide a glimpse into the genius of the greek mathematicians: Eratosthenes’ approximation of the Earth’s circumference.

Eratosthenes observed that on the longest day of the year, sunlight would shine directly into a well, so that the bottom of the well could be seen.  But that farther from the well, in other towns, this did not occur.  The well was located on the town of Syene, which we now lies directly on the tropic of cancer.

Syene Well

In Alexandria, a known distance away from Syene, Erotosthenes measured the angle produced by the sun’s rays off a post in the ground.

SyeneAlex

Taking this further, we can use alternate-interior angles to use this same measured angle as one coming from the center of the earth.

earth

This central angle, along with the known distance from Syene to Alexandria, yielded an estimate of about 25,000 miles (or the Greek stadia equlivalent), an estiamate with an error of less than 1% of the actual circumference!  Both classes I visited seemed to enjoy this math diversion in the Western Civ class, with one student wanting to know more about how the Greeks approximated pi.

So find your local Social Studies teacher, and offer to bring in a little math!  There are some fascinating stories to tell.

Resources:

Excerpt from String, Straightedge and Shadow

From the Mathematical Association of America

From Jochen Albrecht, CUNY

Finally, from Carl Sagan’s landmark series “Cosmos”

Adventures in Common Denominators

At my high school, I host “math lab” on alternate days.  The lab is an open room where students can obtain math help during their lunch or free period.  I like this assignment because I get to see a lot of different kids during the week, gain some insight into the approaches of my colleagues, and get my hands dirty in many math courses.

Last week one of my “regulars”, who often leaves class early for sports, came to the lab for Algebra 2 help.  He missed out on a adding/subtracting rational expressions lesson, but had the notesheets handy.  We wrote the first problem on the board:

Problem 1

Nothing too fancy. But in math lab, I don’t know the students as well as my own, so I need to do a quick check for some background before diving into new material. A spot check for understanding of fraction operations was in order:

Add Fracts

The student approached the board confidently and “added” the fractions:

adding

…sigh…. sometimes there isn’t enough coffee in the world. But all is not lost, and after a stare-down, the student recognized he had acted too quickly, and completed the problem correctly. This led to another problem. This time, I asked the student to just tell what me what the common denominator would be:

Problem 4

Without hesitation, the student knew the correct denominator to be 24. But why is it 24? The student could not defend his answer, but was absolutely sure 24 was the LCD. On the one hand, I am happy that the student has achived enough fluency with his number sense to confidently find the denominator. But, on the other hand, has lack of a process is going to hurt us now when we try to apply LCD’s to algebraic expressions.

TRY THIS WITH YOUR STUDENTS

When I start my lesson on adding rational expressions, I hand out index cards to every student.  I give students 2 minutes to repond to the following prompt:

How do you find a least common denominator? Provide directions for finding an LCD to somebody who does not know how to find one.

I collect all of the cards, shuffle them, and choose a few randomly to share under the document camera.  We will discuss the validity of the explanations, and use parts of the explanations to come up with a class-wide definition of an LCD.  Here is what you can expect to get back on the cards:

  • Some students will recognize that factors play a role, but won’t recognize that the powers of the factors are imporant.
  • Many students will attempt to use an example as their definition.  This allows for a discussion of a mathematical definition.  Is one example helpful in establishing a rule?  How about 2 examples?  How are examples helpful, if the reader does not know how to find an LCD?
  • Some students will provide a hybrid of the last two bullets.
  • If a student does provide a suitable definition, it’s time for you to play dumb.  Let the class assess the language and verify that the definition is, or is not, suitable.  In one class, I “planted” a working definition in with the student cards to see if they could identify a working definition.

The Least Common Denominator of two or more fractions is the product of the factors of all denominators, raised to the highest power with which they appear in any denominator.

HOW DO EARLIER MATH EXPERIENCES PROVIDE A SUITABLE BACKGROUND FOR RATIONAL EXPRESSIONS IN ALGEBRA?

I am curious how math teachers approach Least Common Denominators in earlier grades, and how these approaches translate to algebra success.  Here’s how a few online math sites approach LCD’s.

First up, mathisfun (search for “Least Common Denominator):

Mathisfun

This is the approach I suspect many teachers take to help students find LCD’s.  It works for manageable denominators, but becomes cumbersome when we have 3 or more denominators to consider, and certainly is not helpful in our algebra world.  Also, if you get too confused, you can use the “Least Common Multiple Tool” this website provides.  I suppose it’s not an inappropriate method, but a more algebra-friendly process should eventually develop.

Next up, Everyday Mathematics at Home website:

EM

The good news – we have a formal definition!

The bad news – you have to know what an LCM is to use it.

This is a more formal version of the Mathisfun example.  We could adapt it for use in algebra, but again, a definition of LCM is required here.

Khan Academy starts by using lists of multiples and provides and example with a trio of numbers for which we want the LCM:

Khan

The factor trees and the color verification that all 6, 15, and 10 are all factors of 30 is nice, but this example conveniently leaves out any scenario where a number is a factor multiple times, and this is the only example given.

Finally, let’s check out how PurpleMath tackles LCM’s, with a non-intuitive example:

PM

Now we are getting someplace.  Not only does this method stress the importance of factors, it shows the importance of include all powers of those factors.  And I could transfer this method easily to algebra class!

Have any insihgts into teaching LCD’s, either for a fractions unit, or in algebra?  Would enjoy hearing ideas, feedback and reflections!

Use Appropriate Tools Strategically

This semester, my Algebra 2 students will be exposed to a wealth of math tech tools.  Graphing calculators will be a big part of what happens in my classroom; not only because they are great tools for discovery, but also because I feel some responsibility to have students understand the appropriate use of these tools as they head towards AP classes.  Forcing a tool upon students because it will help them on a test is weak, I know…I cry myself to sleep sometimes…though I do rely on the technology to craft discovery moments in my class.

But I also want my students to experience other tools, like the Desmos calculator (which we will use later for the world-famous Conic Sections project), Geogebra and Wolfram|Alpha (reviewed earlier here on the blog).  So, how do I get my students to experience all of these tools, and start to make measured decisions about how and when to use them?  Hey, we have a Standard for Mathemaical Practice for that!

CCSS.Math.Practice.MP5 Use appropriate tools strategically.

Lost in the great stuff on precision, modeling and reasoning is this awesome nugget, with a specific focus on tech tools:

Mathematically proficient students at various grade levels are able to identify relevant external mathematical resources, such as digital content located on a website, and use them to pose or solve problems. They are able to use technological tools to explore and deepen their understanding of concepts.

Nice!  Exactly what I am looking for!  So, how do you do that?  How do you get students to start comparing and assessing tools?

Here is the day 1 assignment I gave to my students in Algebra 2, as posted on Edmodo:

Write a product review for the Desmos online calculator. Consider its pros and cons, and whether you feel this is a site you would recommend to others. One side of a piece of paper MAX. Screen shots allowed and encoraged. Can be turned in via hard copy, or electronically.

Thats it.  Go ahead, kick the tires, and tell me what you find.  I didn’t make students aware of my on-going man-crush with Desmos or that I had done a webinar for them.  I had no idea what I was going to get back.  And since I stress written communication in my classes (moreso, I suppose, than many math teachers), this gave me a first writing sample to analyze.

The results were largely encouraging.  While many students focused solely on the graphing of functions, some students demonstrated evidence of digging deeper, looking for characteristics which make Desmos unique.  Some snippets:

Unlike the normal graphing calculator, it graphs your equation as you are typing it and allows you to delete parts of the equation if your graph isn’t what you wanted it to be. Desmos also provides the general equations for many different lines, parabolas, and other more advanced graphs.

The example graph list on the left side of the screen acts as a jump start and learning tool to give confused students a boost in the right direction.

It is quick, simple, and efficient to use and is recommended to all users that seek a tool for graphing. The designs are not distracting but sleek and a simple white to emphasize the purpose of the tool, for math and nothing else.

The Desmos is different, its not complicated at all, it can do so many things that most calculators can’t, and it’s free. The fact that Desmos is free is really what makes it so much better than all of the other because you don’t have to shell $120 out of your pocket for a calculator that has all the same capabilities that Desmos has.

But not all is sunny, as some students noted some “Cons”:

With the internet calculator, there is the obvious issue of no internet, no calculator. Also, I found some buttons were tough to get to such as the “pi” key which required me to press several buttons in order to get that one.

One last thing about the calculator is the fact that it can be downloaded as an app, but only on apple products. For android users, like myself, you would have to use the calculator through the internet which isn’t as easy to use as through an app.  Also, the app is accessible without wireless internet connection, but android users need the wireless connection to use the Desmos calculator.

All told, a good first writing assignment for my students, followed by some discussions of tools and their appropriate use.  As we travel through Algebra 2, many chances to compare tools, and discuss the best tool for the job.  Looking forward to doing another product review, using Wolfram|Alpha.  Stay tuned.

Talking Inverses and the Enigma Machine

Here is a challenge which has appeared on my classroom board, in various forms, over the past 10 years:

Board

Can you decode the message?  In 10 years, I have given out zero gift cards….so good luck.  More info on this challenge below.


A trip today to the Franklin Institute science museum in philadelphia reminded me some of cryptography nuggets you can use in math class; in particular, discussion starters for inverses, and code-breaking using matrices.  One of the first artifacts we encountered in the exhibit was the Enigma machine shown below, which I fawned over like a teenage girl at a One Direction concert.

Enigma

The Engima machine is a coding machine, used primarily during World War II, to both code and decode messages.  Messages were typed using a standard keyboard.  The electric signals from the keyboard passed through a system of rotors and plugs, and lit up a letter, which was recorded.  There were a number of variations of the machine over the war years, and the Allied forces employed many mathematicians, many working through Blechtley Park in London, to intrcept and de-code messages.

Consider this intercepted message:

LXFAVPBNAQMHIZJPBMMRCSWOI

How would you even start to decode this message?  Does a one-to-one correspondance seem reasonable?  How else can letters be coded?

You can try your hand with some coding using this Enigma Simulator, which shows the coding rotors, inputs and outputs.  But here’s the neat thing about the Enigma machine: the machine is used to both code AND decode messages, using similar procedures, which are outlind here.

Flowchart

So, now you have everything you need to decode my message it seems.  You have a message, and a device.  Oh, but those pesky rotors.  If they aren’t set correctly, then the machine is of little help.  Working through this issue was the task of many of the mathematicians during WWII.  And I want you to be successful!  Set those pesky rotors to R-J-L (my initials), and start typing!  You can also copy and paste the message, but it is far more fun to watch the rotors do their work as you type.

Embedded in all of this crypography history are some neat math discussions:

  • After looking at some messages and their coded outputs, is there a ONE-TO-ONE correspondance here?  For example, does the letter E in a coded message always map to the same decoded output letter?
  • Are there any patterns we can use to help decode the message? Any predictable behavior?
  • A message is coded using a rotor setting.  Then this coded message is typed, using the same rotor settings, and we get back the original message.  The Enigma machine is its own INVERSE!  How exciting is that!  How many ideas or devices do we know of which are their own inverse?

Here are some sites with additional information relating to the Engima:

Exploring the Enigma, from +Plus Magazine.  Good student reading, with guiding questions.

This Numberphile Video has a demonstrations of the gears and plugboard of the Enigma, and some explanation of combinations.


In my next post, we’ll look at Hill’s Cipher, a cryptography application of matrices, and think about my Best Buy challenge!

A New Start for The Blog?

So, the name of this blog is “MathCoachBlog”.  I picked the blog name about a year-and-a-half ago, as I was working in my district’s curriculum office, and hoped to use this forum to share ideas, resources and experiences.  I treasure the opportunities I have had to share with others, the kind feedback people have given me about many of the activities, and the many friends I have made through this blog and twitter.

But here’s the thing: I’m not an academic coach anymore.  After 2 years working with some great people in my office, I have chosen to go back to the classroom.  This was purely my decision, and I am looking forward to implementing many of the ideas and resources I have been encountered in the last 2 years.  I’m thinking of it as a mid-career re-set, and in some ways I am more energized to teach classes than I ever was before.

But the blog….keep the name?  Change the name?  Keep it?  Change it?  We’ll get back to that….


This week, I had to set-up a new classroom for the first time in a long time.  I was in the same room for 13 years before, and had to pack a lot of stuff when I moved into an office.  So, time to dust off the cobwebs, think about what’s important, and do some moving-in.  Here are some elements I like to have in my classroom.  What are some neat things you like to have to create a positive classroom culture?

I like to tell a lot of stories in my class, think about anecdtoes from previous years, and keep in contact with as many former students as I can.  For AP Statistics, the “Wall of 5’s” has always been a topic of conversation, and a goal for many students who strive to eventually be “immortalized”.  It’s a nice hook the AP classes.  Thanks to my colleague Joel, who kept the wall alive the past 2 years, and has now made a duplicate wall for his classroom.

Wall of Fives

Along the same lines, I like to have lots of pictures from previous years around.  Many of these are from our annual Stats Fair, and are great conversation starters.

Stats Fair

The Wall of Badges: more chances to talk about my experiences as a Siemens STEM Fellow, an AP reader, and conference junkie.

Badges

Cool art.  Escher works always generate buzz.  Now with 100% more Legoes!

Escher

T-shirts from math contests our math club has attended provide just the right amount of geek-pride.

Shirts

And finally, the oragami art a graduate made for me is the best gift ever, and gets it own spot in the room.  Special appearance by John McClain – a “Secret Santa” gift.

Oragami


So, about the name of the blog…  Since I announced my return to the classroom, I have had lots of conversations with colleagues in my department, and know I am blessed to work with many fantastic people.  Sometimes we don’t agree on things, and that’s healthy.  And I’m thrilled to be able to implement so many of the great new things I have learned, and continue to share them out to you.  So, I’m no longer a coach in my district, but I think that, in many ways, I way wind up being a more effective coach to my friends online through the sharing of classroom ideas.  So, MATHCOACHBLOG LIVES ON!

Also, it’s sort of a pain to change the name,….so there ‘s that.